PLAGIARISM

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  1. Course work, essays, dissertations and theses submitted for assessment must be the students own work unless in the case of group projects a joint effort is expected and is indicated as such.
  2. Unacknowledged direct copying from work of another person, or the close paraphrasing of somebody else’s work, is called plagiarism and is a serious offence, equated with cheating in examinations. This applies to copy both from other students’ work and from published sources such as books, reports or journal articles. Plagiarised material may originate from any source. It is as serious to use material from the World Wide Web or from a computer-based encyclopaedia or literature archive as it is to use material from a printed source if it is not properly acknowledged.
  3. Use of quotations or data from the work of others is entirely acceptable and is often very valuable, provided that the source the quotation or data are given. Failure to provide a source or put quotation marks around material that is taken from elsewhere gives the appearance that the comments are ostensibly one’s own. When quoting word-for-word from the work of another person quotation marks or indenting (setting the quotation from the margin) must be used and the source of the quoted material must be acknowledged.
  4. Paraphrasing, when the original statement is still identifiable and has no acknowledgement, is plagiarism. Taking a piece of text, from whatever source, and substituting words or phrases with other words or phrases is plagiarism. Any paraphrase of another person’s work must have an acknowledgement to the source. It is not acceptable to put together unacknowledged passages from the same or from different sources linking these together with a few words or sentences of your own and changing a few words from the original text: this is regarded as over-dependence on other sources, which is a form of plagiarism.
  5.  Direct quotation from an earlier piece of the student’s own work, if unattributed, suggests that the work is original, when in fact it is not. The direct copying of one’s own writing qualifies as plagiarism if the fact that the work has been or is to be presented elsewhere is not acknowledged.
  6. Sources of quotations used should be listed in full in a bibliography at the end of the piece of work and in a style required by the student’s department.
  7. Plagiarism is a serious offence and will always result in the imposition of a penalty. In deciding upon the penalty LRN UK will take into account factors such as the year of study, the extent and proportion of the work that has been plagiarised and the apparent intent of the student. The penalties that can be imposed range from a minimum of a zero mark for the work (with or without allowing resubmission) through the downgrading of the degree class, the award of a lesser qualification (eg a pass degree rather than distinction, a diploma rather than a degree) to disciplinary measures such as suspension or expulsion.

Assessed Coursework for course unit: ……………………………………………….

Course Name: ………………………………………………………………………….

I certify that this assessed coursework includes no plagiarism as defined in the above university statements, which I have read and understood.

Name ……………………………………………

Surname ……………………………………….

Signature

Date